Food Traceability on Blockchain

Report Overview

Author: Reshma Kamath
Release Date: September 28, 2017

Abstract:

This case study looks at Walmart’s pilot projects with IBM to track mangoes in the Americas and pork in China, from farm to table with focus on food safety. Blockchain technology helps to identify the source of contamination quickly, so that food producers, processors, distributors, and retailers can act quickly and protect the public from harm.

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